OPTIONAL and ALTERNATE RULES SECTION

 

Background on Optional and Alternate Rules

The 21st Century Battlefield (21CB) was one (won?) of electronics, computers, and countermeasures.  All vehicles in OGRE and GEV carry ECM, ECCM, and a dedicated PDS array capable of spoofing and protecting the vehicle (more or less to one degree or another).  Convoys and stacked units were often protected by a dedicated ADS Area Defense System and the modular design of the compact TAC missiles made tailoring them with 'modules' and 'add-ons' a very cost effective way to enhance their already deadly effectiveness.  The ECM, ECCM, and PDS are already factored into the attack and defense strength of each unit in the game, that is, a heavy tank, as presented in attack strength and defense strength, takes into account that it is equipped with a standard, front line modern ECM / ECCM suite and is protected not only by its composite shell of BPC armor but also by a dedicated PDS system that acted independently of the other defense systems.

However, as in any arms race, sometimes one side will gain an advantage over the other side, a temporary advantage be that as it may, but an advantage nonetheless and during this time one side will have the upper hand, albeit for a little while.  History shows us time and time again that when an advantage is obtained over an enemy, that advantage will be pressed for all its capacity.  

The following optional rules must be agreed upon by both or all players prior to use.  These rules are presented in order to simulate the ever changing tide of war in the 21CB and the world of OGRE and GEV.  The Last War, if anything else, was the world's greatest and longest full contact arms race...

Currently implemented alternative rules

 

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SPEED VERSUS SECURITY- The defense value of a unit takes into effect several factors; speed, ability to terrain mask as well as armor, ECM / ECCM, and both passive and active (point defense) defense systems.  The speed of vehicles in the game is a defensive, conservative combat speed, one designed to give the vehicle the optimum amount of speed and maneuverability while being able to both dodge in and out of protective terrain as well as attack.  Units in the game may move faster, but they give up some amount of overall defense in doing so.  Moving faster than the stated speed will reduce the rated defense factor by one point.  Any unit which has their defensive factor reduced to a D of 0 is automatically destroyed on any attack which generates a result other than "NE".

Moving faster, a unit may move one additional hex per movement turn (GEVs will now move 5/4) and the bonus for traveling on roads is also doubled (2 extra movement points per turn for regular units, four total bonus movement points for GEVs).  This decision is made on a turn by turn basis and must be stated before a unit moves.  The effect lasts the entire turn with regards to attacks by other units and defense of the speeding unit.  Thus, a GEV could choose to move 5/4 during one turn, hoping to close quickly to a skirmish farther north.  It chooses to move faster, moving 5 hexes (4 normal move plus one additional hex for extra speed) but its defense is reduced from D2 to D1 for the entire turn.  It has the misfortune of passing too close to an enemy heavy tank which fires on the speeding GEV, the attack odds are 4 to 1 (4/2 vs D1), an almost sure kill for the heavy.  Extra speed may not be used by Infantry as special rules exist for Infantry (see "FASTER MOBILE INFANTRY" below).  OGREs which choose to move at a faster speed have ALL of their individual components defensive values decreased by D1 for that turn.  OGRE treads are not reduced in defensive strength (all attacks still remain at 1:1 odds) but any damage incurred to the treads is doubled.

Extra speed represents a reckless abandon for traditional terrain masking and other 'defensive driving' of vehicles for the shortest path to the destination and pour on the speed.  Like all gambles in combat, you take your chances.

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MULTIPLE UNIT ATTACKS- The one aspect of OGRE and GEV that I never could fully understand was the 'one attack, one target' per turn.  I believe that the time frame given in the game (4 minutes per turn) would allow any armored unit to engage multiple targets within its range.  The nature of the weapon systems used in the Last War allow any unit to use both indirect fire and direct fire.  This optional rule brings in the concept of simultaneous combat and allows any armor or infantry unit to engage once per turn ANY enemy unit in range of its weapons.  For example, a Combine Heavy Tank could move three hexes in one turn.  At the end of this move, it is within range of two Paneuropean units, a light tank and a GEV.  The Combine player may fire once on each of these units in the same turn, and only once.  If any units survive, they may immediately return fire even though it is not their turn to move and act.

This rule assumes simultaneous combat between the units.  In the example above, the Heavy Tank fires on the light tank and the GEV and notes the results.  At the same time, in game turns, the two units may return fire on the Heavy (since all units are in the same range).  All results are applied after all combatants have had their fire turns.  Thus, the Heavy Tank may fire on and destroy the Light tank but draw a NE result against the GEV.  The Light Tank chooses to fire before it is destroyed and receives a D result against the Heavy Tank.  The GEV returns fire also, and receives another D result, thus eliminating the Heavy Tank (and any further movement it might have had).  The GEV awaits its normal turn to move and fire.   Units which are fired upon may return fire even if it is not their turn to fire and even if they have already fired this turn, as long as the attacking unit is in range of the defending unit.  This represents a "snapshot" type attack taken against an enemy that either comes into range with the weapon systems automatically acquiring, locking on and firing on any enemy targets on the fly.  Most of the computers aboard the vehicles found on the 21st century battlefield would be capable of directing multiple rounds onto multiple targets in a short span of time and any enemy unit that came within range of a weapon system would be engaged actively as well as aggressively.

This rule makes for more fluid combat with a slight bit more mental record keeping and your games should go a lot quicker.

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FASTER MOBILE INFANTRY-  One of the biggest things that players gripe about is the fact that mobile infantry can't keep up with other armor units.   There are specialized infantry transport and fighting carriers but these only add to the initial cost of the infantry.  The initial movement allowance of 2 hexes per turn by infantry is seen as a handicap by some who view the advent of powered armor as the final step in finally letting the individual soldier keep up with heavier vehicular armor on the battlefield and making the soldier less reliant on other means of transport to, around and from the battlefield.  This is not portrayed in the game very well as infantry, unless they are carried, are usually the last units to join any distant battle.  For those who wish to enhance their infantry movement, they may now do so, but just like armored vehicles, higher speed has its own sobering price.

Any mobile infantry squad may move three hexes per turn but any turn that an infantry unit moves three hexes, any attacks made against them are shifted one level to the right, thus if the an infantry unit moving 3 hexes per turn were attacked by a GEV, normally the odds would be 2 to 1 but since the infantry is moving recklessly, trading speed for solid tactical doctrine and defense, they undergo an attack as if the attack was at 3 to 1 odds.  The infantry are giving up fast NOE speed hopping from hard cover to hard cover for longer, higher jumps and covering the most ground in the quickest amount of time.  They are sacrificing one of their inherent advantages for increased speed.   While they aren't taking every chance they can, they are taking a lot more chances than they normally would which translates into a higher threat.  Infantry which choose to move faster do so at a risk to their defense.  Going faster, they can't defend as well and they can't use terrain to the best of their ability which is a natural for infantry.

This effect applies even if fast moving infantry are traveling through terrain that would normally give them an added defensive bonus (swamp, woods, town or city hexes, etc.).  Thus in open terrain, a regular 1/1 D1 infantry unit moving fast would have a D1 defense factor and any attack against it would be shifted one column to the right on the CRT.  If the same unit were moving fast through a swamp or forest hex, it would be D2 instead of D1 and any attack against it would be shifted one column to the right on the CRT.  If it were moving fast through town or city hex, it would have D3 instead of D1 and any attack against it would be shifted one column to the right on the CRT.

ALTERNATIVE RULE ON FAST MI MOVEMENT: Another choice is to give the mobile infantry an extra or second move per turn like GEVs utilize.  This would represent the basic ability of infantry to move, attack, and the survivors to move out to better positions or consolidate their real estate.  Mobile infantry may move one and only one additional hex per turn in the second infantry movement phase.   Moving this additional hex is done in the phase right before the SECOND GEV MOVEMENT PHASE of a turn, that is, all mobile infantry that are going to move an additional hex this turn do so before players move their GEVs their second movement allowance.  Using this alternate infantry movement rule, do not reduce infantry defense value or adjust the CRT results.  The new faster MI movement phase would come right after step 5: Fire Phase and before step 6: Second GEV movement phase of a turn.

Needless to say, mobile infantry being carried by GEV-PCs or any other type of 'transport' cannot "move fast" while being carried.

Regular 'non-mobile' non-power suit equipped infantry and militia do not benefit from this extra infantry move capacity or if used, the second infantry movement turn.

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TACTICAL MANEUVERABLE MINES-  The advent of mechanized warfare led to a resurgence in the age old art of mine warfare.  Long used to break up cavalry charges, mine warfare became somewhat of an art with a variety of modern mines available to the belligerents of the Last War.  As munitions got more complex, their capabilities grew increasingly sophisticated.  The most advanced of these feral hunter killer devices were the 'intelligent' munitions such as the Combine T4 AMM Autonomous Maneuverable Munition.  The T4 AMM was an enhanced effect munition, a self maneuvering 'thinking' mine capable of detecting, tracking, and engaging the enemy up to two kilometers away with lethal results.

The low EMS array system was capable of being emplaced and left unattended.  The autonomous munition would wait, passively for weeks or months (sometimes years) scanning for any evidence of enemy units (a small dedicated solar cell array kept the unit powered almost indefinitely through passive thermal accumulation).  If an enemy unit was detected, a small ejector charge would propel the mine from its buried position while sensors achieved a positive lock-on to the target, orienting the mine toward the target for its final high speed dash.  Once free of its concealed position, the mine would activate a dual stage high compression ducted fan array and quickly maneuver to the target for attack.   The fan array was a very high performance variant allowing a high speed, low delay dash to the target that would give most PDS and other active countermeasures fits.   The warhead was an improved munition capable of defeating most armor or infantry at the time, if a solid hit could be achieved.

The 'sleeper' mine was available from 2060 on for the Combine and a variant of the design was available from 2065 on for the Paneuropean forces and other nations.  Many 'sleeper' mines were still active long after hostilities ended, producing horrible casualties to refugees and other non-military targets.

For game purposes, use Rule 8.02 of GEV.  Any type of mine used can be converted to a 'sleeper' type mine.  The mine is located somewhere on the map (noted secretly by the owning player on a piece of paper).  If an enemy unit approaches within two hexes (the hex the mine is located in and the six surrounding hexes) of the hidden mine, roll for mine detonation normally.  The only difference between a regular mine and a 'sleeper' mine is that the 'sleeper' can actually engage its target at a distance instead of a normal mine which must be rolled over or stepped on to activate.

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INFANTRY CARRIERS STRUCK BY MINES.  If a vehicle carrying an infantry (mobile infantry, regular infantry, or militia unit) unit strikes and detonates a mine (see OGRE optional rule 8.03 and GEV optional rule 8.02), then the infantry unit is destroyed along with the vehicle.  Any mine powerful enough to knock out any vehicle instantly will also kill any infantry unit carried by that unit.   This applies also to those of you who still use the "infantry riding tanks" rule.  If a GEV-PC with three squads of infantry hits a mine and is destroyed, then all three squads are also considered to be destroyed.

Optional rule for MI hitching a ride or in a GEV-PC struck by a mine- If the vehicle is attacked by a mine, all infantry carried undergo an immediate 1:1 attack.  Roll for each infantry unit.  If an infantry unit survives, it is left in the spot where the mine detonated and cannot move or fire for the rest of the turn (but can defend and engage in overrun combat if an enemy unit enters its hex).

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These rules are used in addition to the optional rules for mines found in OGRE (8.03) and GEV (8.02).  While those rules represent a single, large semi-bright device, these rules represent many smaller, smarter devices that can be carried and deployed by infantry squads or by artillery and special vehicles.

Mines are purchased at the beginning of a scenario or determined by scenario pre-setup factors.  Each strength point of infantry used instead to buy mines will buy 10 hexes worth of mines, but these mines must be carried by individual squads and emplaced.  For each armor point given up in the initial unit selection at the beginning of a scenario, ten hexes worth of artillery deliverable mines may be taken instead.  These mines must be delivered either via OGRE missile, missile tank, or any type of howitzer.  The enemy player can detect that a unit has fired, but the mine field owner is not obliged to tell which hex the mine field has been deployed in.   This is written down in secret and only revealed when an enemy unit enters the mined hex and triggers the attack.

In a scenario where one side has an OGRE or OGRES and no armor units, then that player may freely exchange any number of missile warheads for mine laying warheads on a 1:1 basis.  That is, if a player were given a Mark III OGRE, he could choose to take one or two mine laying missiles in place of the two missiles that the Mark III normally carries.  The type of warhead is also predetermined at the start of the scenario and may not be changed once the scenario begins.  An OGRE mine laying missile has an attack factor of ZERO and a range of 5 hexes.  At any range up to its maximum, the OGRE missile owner may declare that the missile has delivered a self-deploying mine field.   The exact hex is noted secretly and only revealed when an enemy unit enters it and triggers a mine attack.

Mines may be delivered by specialized vehicles (minelayers), artillery, missile, cruise missile, or placed lovingly by hand using basic infantry and MI units.   Mines may only be cleared or swept by specialized vehicles (minesweepers), combat engineers, MACE units, or by the desired method insisted on by all opposing forces, that of actually triggering the mine!

Each infantry squad may carry enough mines to mine one hex worth of AV or AP mines.  What type of mine a particular squad is carrying should be noted on a piece of paper and kept track of.

A howitzer may fire special shells which deploy the mines over an entire hex.   A player may purchase 5 mine laying shells for one armor point at the beginning of a scenario during armor and infantry unit selection.

To mine a hex by hand, an infantry unit (any type including engineers) must spend an entire turn in the hex to be mined.  The unit may defend normally but may not attack.  It takes one turn to setup either a AV or AP mine field.  The location of the mine field is noted, as well as its type.  If the mine-laying infantry unit attacks, the process of setting up the minefield is interrupted and must be started again next turn.

To determine if an AV mine detonates when any VEHICLE enters the hex, roll the vehicle's defense or less on one die.  If the roll succeeds, the mine field does not attack the vehicle.  Roll for each vehicle entering the hex.  If the mine detonates, roll an immediate attack on the 1:1 odds on the CRT.  Infantry, even mobile infantry, do not set off AV mines.  The mines are smart enough not to go off for different classes of targets.  OGREs which enter a mined hex filled with AV mines automatically set off ALL of the mines and lose 1 (d6 roll, even result) or 2 (d6 roll, odd result)  treads.  Repeat this roll for all six mines.  On a roll of 6 exactly with each attack, one randomly determined component of the OGRE undergoes a 1:1 attack (the mine got really, really lucky...).  The light AV mines are really too small and light to affect something as big as an OGRE, but some damage could occur if the mine was lucky or the OGRE was unlucky...

AP mines detonate when an infantry (any type, including MI) unit enters the hex.  The infantry unit immediately undergoes a 1:1 odds attack on the CRT and results are applied.  If using the optional rules for disabling of power infantry, 'D' results apply.  If not, then for MI all 'D' results are ignored (their suits protect them enough from the shrapnel / splinters...).  Lesser armored infantry don't have it so lucky.  A D0 command post or unit entering a AP mined hex may be attacked (the mine also recognizes soft targets of opportunity, and its blast is pretty effective against such targets).

Combat engineers or MACE units may clear a mined hex.  Neither sets off AV mines.  Clearing a hex of mines takes one full turn during which the unit may not move or attack (but can defend in overrun situations).  Clearing a AP mine hex is slightly different.  A combat engineer squad must move adjacent to the hex and stop.   Next turn they enter the hex and may do nothing but defend.  The next turn, they may try to clear the hex, roll a single die.  On any result but a 6, the hex is cleared.  On a 6, the combat engineers detonate an AP mine they were trying to clear (oops!), roll a 1:1 attack on the CRT.  For MACE units, treat the AP mine as a AV mine.  MACE units, due to their better electronics and protection, do not have a chance to set off the mine accidentally.

Infantry units could 'reload' their mine supplies at any friendly CP, fortress, or bunker.  This takes one turn during which the infantry unit is considered to be 'inside' the structure.  CPs and other 'friendly' military facilities have an 'unlimited' amount of mines for this purpose (at least as far as the scale and level of the scenario are concerned).

Structures may be mined, but only with AP mines (vehicles don't go into buildings much...).  The mine detonates on a trip wire / motion / EMS type array on the first entry by a infantry unit into the building.

Infantry may mine ANY hex that they can enter normally.  This includes mining water hexes, etc. but if a water hex is mined, then only units which can enter the water and are assumed to be traveling in / on the water can be affected by mines placed in water hexes.  Swamps and all other hexes may be mined, including rail and bridge hexes as well as town and city hexes.

Infantry may mine their own hex.  They are immune to the effects of their own mines, this is termed an ambush.  Any unit wishing to enter into an overrun type attack with the infantry unit must first undergo attack by the appropriate mine if it is present.  Surviving units then come under fire by the infantry unit in normal overrun procedure.

A hex that is mined stays so for the entire scenario or game length, unless it is cleared.  However, the chance that a unit passing through the hex will be attacked by one of the mines diminishes with each unit passing through and each unit attacked.   Each minefield (regardless of type) has six 'attacks' which decrease by one for every additional unit attacked until all the mines are used up.

Mine fields require some additional paperwork, or counters can be created by the players.  The type of minefield and the amount of mine attacks remaining should be shown, such as AV 6 meaning that a anti-vehicular mine field is present, it is fresh, and the next unit into the mine field will be attacked automatically.  A AP3 counter would represent a half used AP mine field.

Once a field is detected, its relative strength can be tactically determined and this information relayed to all friendly units.  The mine field owner knows at all times what the strength of their mine fields are.  If their TAC net is up and working, when a mine detonates, it sends a short pulse to the net, identifying its target while any remaining mines in the field can offer post detonation target status, damage assessment, etc.

A unit that enters a mine field and comes under attack only suffers one attack per turn.  If a unit stays in the hex the next turn, it will come under attack again at reduced chance of attack.  The mines have limited mobility ('jumping') and will fling themselves at any enemy target dumb enough to remain in range of the individual mines.

Combat engineers and MACE units can detect minefields in adjacent hexes automatically.

Scout units can detect minefields in adjacent hexes.  OGREs of all types and Marks are counted as scouts for this purpose.

Infantry may remove their OWN mines, pack them back up, and move on to reset them in different locations!  Only friendly infantry and friendly minefields can be done so.  A Paneuropean infantry unit can't pick up a Combine mine field and redeploy it elsewhere, but a Paneuropean infantry unit could pick up a Paneuropean mine field and redeploy it elsewhere.  This takes one turn per type of mine and during this turn the infantry unit may not move or attack but defends normally.  Minefields that are packed up are packed up at their CURRENT strength, and when redeployed, are redeployed at their CURRENT strength.  I.E. a infantry unit deploys a AP minefield.  The minefield makes two attacks, meaning that it is now at 4 strength or AP 4.  When the infantry unit redeploys this mine field, it will again be redeployed at AP 4 strength, not the original AP 6 strength.  An infantry unit may pick up another friendly infantry unit's mines and move them.  No infantry unit may carry more than one AV and one AP minefield, though they could carry two of the same kind and none of the other, or any combination desired.

Both types of mines may be placed in a single hex.  The hex is noted secretly by the infantry owning player and the mines are only revealed when they are either detected by a combat engineer or MACE unit, or they are detonated by a enemy unit.  If one type of mine detonates, it does not detonate the other type of mine if both types share the same hex.  A hex remains mined for the entire scenario (they have enough mines to pretty much set up thorough kill zones for repeated access by personnel or armored vehicles).  The mines used by Infantry are light, man portable, non-ferrous units that are very hard to detect (mostly ceramic, polymer, and other non-metallic materials). 

Vehicles will NOT set off AP mines and infantry will not set off AV mines.  An enemy unit passing through a mined hex that does not set off the mines may detect the type of mine and spread this information, thus if a enemy heavy tank passed through a hex that had been setup with AP mines, the location and type of the mines would be known.  If an enemy infantry unit passed through a hex that had been mined for AV operations, they would not set off the mines but could warn the owning player that a mined hex was present and that AV mines were detected. AP mines only affect D0 or MI targets.   AV mines affect anything with a D1 or greater except MI.

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SLICS-Squad Level Integration and Countermeasure Systems- While not really an optional rule, more information can be found on the SLICS system under the REFERENCES page.  The SLICS system is the method by which MI can 'combine' their squads to build on their attack and defense strengths or stack together.  Without SLICS, this would not be possible.

Normally, infantry squads which combine simply combine attack strength.  Using the SLICS system, infantry squads also combine defensive strength as well.  That is, under the old rule, two 1/1 D1 infantry squads coming together would simply form a 2/1 infantry unit with a defense factor of 1.   Using SLICS, two 1/1 D1 infantry squads  coming together in the same hex would interface and become a 2/1 D2 infantry unit.  If another squad joined them, the three squads would become a 3/1 D3 infantry unit. 

One optional rule is that a squad being transported with a personnel carrier (any type of Combine APC, like LGEV-PC, GEV-PC, IFV, APC, etc.) can integrate with the carrier through SLICS, adding the carrier attack and defense strength to their unit normally.  SLICS was an integrated system, and the Combine doctrine of squad wide resources included the carrier weapons and defenses also.   When using SLICS, each squad may integrate itself with its carrier thus under the idea of SLICS and the Combine MI, a squad of MI and their carriers (either three LGEV-PC or a GEV-PC and a LGEV-PC) would not only count their individual attack and defense strength together, but also that of their carriers as well.  A single squad and their LGEV-PC carrier could combine attack strength and defense value under the SLICS system.

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DISABLING OGRE WEAPONS AND TREADS- I always wondered why OGRE components were immune to "D" results on the CRT and several games we played allowed the various components to be disabled instead of destroyed.  Having components disabled increases the paperwork somewhat, but creates very interesting situations almost on a turn by turn basis.  As the OGRE player, you have main batteries, secondary batteries, AP batteries, and missiles.  What if one or some of these became temporarily knocked out, disabled, or off-line JUST when you really needed it.  The OGRE might have to beat a minor retreat to lick its wounds while it brought auxiliary systems back online.  The tactical situation possibilities are endless and the ability to disable OGRE components adds extra game depth.

Rules for disabling OGRE weapons and treads: (OPTIONAL)

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DISABLING MOBILE INFANTRY- The heavily armored infantry of 21CB were not immune to their electronics being disrupted by EMP and a variety of esoteric weapon side effects such as blast and concussion.   Infantry battledress was a very complex piece of hardware, and though rugged, it was considerably less so than the heavier armored vehicles.  Mobile Infantry can be disabled  just like vehicles.  Their suits can shut down temporarily, their electronics can be jumbled off-line and have to reboot / reset, backups brought on-line, or the infantry soldiers themselves could suffer from short episodes of panic, disorientation, shell shock or a host of other combat related disorders.  The onboard computers of the suits could go far in 'rallying the troops' with carefully injected doses of military combat drug, stimulants, pain killers, pseudorphins, and other methods to clear the muddled thoughts of the power suit equipped soldier and get their mind back on the order of battle.  This optional rule works to simulate the fact that even the complex mobile infantry and their dedicated equipment could be temporary combat losses on the 21CB.  I never liked the idea of a mechanical power suit being considered to be 'eliminated' by a result that would normally disable another vehicle.  I felt that power suits could be stunned and disabled temporarily just like other units and that MI could lose some of their drones, drop their gear, lose their heavy weapons, have to lift fallen trees off of their comrades, or just cower in the bottom of a still smoking crater until they got their senses back.  This rule simulates that belief.

*OPTIONAL RULE- DISABLING MOBILE INFANTRY*

Any squad of Mobile Infantry (not regular infantry) which receives a "D" result on the CRT is considered to be disabled in such a way that the squad is not functioning effectively on a combat readiness level.  The squad is not destroyed, just 'off line' or 'out of it' for a while until their systems can reboot, they can reorganize and collect their gear. This may make them easier to kill, or will just slow them down.  Disabled MI are disabled on a squad by squad basis.  Thus if a platoon (3pts) of MI were attacked, and a "D" result was obtained, one squad would NOT be eliminated, rather it would be disabled, leaving only two squads at effective readiness.  MI squads which are disabled remain so until the end of the enemy's next combat phase at which time the disabled squads recover normally and may resume normal operation.

Disabled MI infantry may not move or fire until they become un-disabled.  They may however, defend normally in overrun attacks.  They may NOT initiate overrun attacks, even if another infantry or armor unit passes through the same hex.  They defend normally in overrun attacks, at full strength (not double strength).

A disabled squad which is disabled a second time is destroyed.

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COMBAT RESULTS TABLE (EXPANDED)

I was always curious about the CRT, and I thought it lacked two very important odds, namely 1-3 and lower and the 5-1 or greater odds chart.  I have included those here in this expanded CRT.  Anything less than 1-3 odds will be "NE" for all rolls, anything at or greater than 5-1 odds will be "X" for all rolls.

COMBAT RESULTS TABLE (EXPANDED)

COMBAT ODDS

DIE ROLL

1-3 or lower

1-2

1-1

2-1

3-1

4-1

5-1
or higher

1

NE

NE

NE

NE

D

D

X

2

NE

NE

NE

D

D

X

X

3

NE

NE

D

D

X

X

X

4

NE

NE

D

X

X

X

X

5

NE

D

X

X

X

X

X

6

D

X

X

X

X

X

X

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PREPARED POSITIONS- Battlefield construction units (combat engineers, combat construction units, OGRENGINEERING units, etc.) can create prepared defensive positions given time.  Prepared positions are defensive earth works and revetments designed to provide 'hull down' positions to vehicles and 'foxholes' for infantry (both MI and normal).  These positions are created using heavy earth moving equipment, careful construction of the earthen berms, reinforcement using ferrocrete sprayed from quick set mixture tanks, and blown BPC plating / reinforcing bracing.  Some prepared positions enjoyed dedicated MAPDS (see below) systems as well as emplaced DAPS (see below).  AP mines and devices were set up if time permitted to prevent unarmored infantry overruns, and dedicated individual jammers and target enhancers were included in some of the revetments for use by the defensive units there, greatly improving their survivability and their attack capacity.

Defensive positions for friendly units can be created in any land hex (not water or swamp).  If the owning player starts with a construction unit in a hex, he may declare that he is preparing the hex for defensive positions for his units.  It takes 12 construction points to create a PREPARED POSITION.  For this purpose, a ALCCV has two (2) construction points, a AHCCV has three (3) construction points, and an Combat Engineer infantry unit has one (1) construction point per squad.  A OGRENGINEERING unit has four construction points (4) per Mark for this purpose, thus a Mark I OGRENGINEERING unit would have 4 construction points, a Mark V OGRENGINEERING unit would have (20) twenty (!) construction points per turn available.  Construction points cannot be 'saved up' over turns, all work not completed this turn is considered to be 'ongoing work in progress'.  Record keeping lets everything be honest and is available for honesty's sake whenever a disagreement arises.  All defensive positions are 'works in progress'.  They do not afford any marginal protection during their buildup.  Once they are complete, they afford complete protection to the unit(s) so berthed.  Defensive positions do NOT have to be created nor do they have to be created in the shortest amount of time.  Even if a PREPARED POSITION was desired by one player, and he had enough construction units / points available in one hex to create a PREPARED POSITION, that player is under no obligation to create such positions, nor are they under the obligation to create the positions in the shortest amount of time possible, though this would be a good idea tactically.  Thus, if a player had enough construction units and construction points assembled in one hex so that they could create a defensive position in one turn, they could take two turns, or four, or however many they desired to create the position.

Normal stacking rules apply with regard to defensive build ups.   Construction units present in a hex ARE counted toward stacking limits.

Only the normal amount of units allowed to 'stack' in a hex may receive the bonus given by occupying a PREPARED POSITION.  This bonus is applied BEFORE any doubling of defense due to an overrun situation or any other terrain bonuses!  Units in a 'prepared' hex which leave that hex may return at any time and receive the bonus, as may the enemy if they occupy the hex with no friendlies present.  If friendly units occupying the hex are destroyed there, the hex is considered to be 'unprepared' again, due to the wreckage blocking the further use of the defensive constructions, etc.  A tank in a carefully prepared hull down position has an advantage, but if an enemy unit brews it up, the wreckage is not going to magically go away, and thus the defensive position would be 'choked' with the wreckage, and unusable by the enemy victor (unless they brought their own AHCCV in and 'prepared' the hex assuming that they either build new emplacements or they simply tow the old wreckage away).  The creation of defensive positions requires some form of additional paperwork, with the hex(s) so prepared being noted by the owner, and their condition constantly recorded when conditions warrant a change in their nature.  The enemy player may ask for the record of defensive positions at any time there is a dispute over the condition of a given hex.  Special 'PREPARED' counters may be created by both players to place under stacked units if so desired.

Example:  a single squad of MACE would take 12 turns to complete prepared positions, but three squads would only take 4 turns.  Three MACE squads working with two AHCCVs could get the job done in two turns.  Six squads and two AHCCVs could get the job done in a single turn.  An Mark III OGRENGINEERING unit could get the job done in a single turn.

UNIT TYPE

CONSTRUCTION POINTS GENERATED PER TURN

Combat Engineering Squad (non-MI)

One (1) construction point per 3 squads*

Mobile Armored Combat Engineering Squad (MACE)

One (1) construction point per squad

ALCCV (Armored Light Combat Construction Vehicle)

Two (2) construction points per unit

AHCCV (Armored Heavy Combat Construction Vehicle)

Four (4) construction points per unit

OGRENGINEERING Unit

Four (4) construction points per Mark per unit

 

Defensive Position

Cost To Construct (construction points)

Modifications

Prepared Positions

12 construction points

Friendly armor unit / infantry defensive strength doubled

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OGRE "TRACKS DOWN" DEFENSIVE POSITIONS were in widespread use for 'watchdog' OGRE units.  The OGREs were simply too big to enjoy traditional 'hull down' positions, unless they were hiding behind a small hill or mountain!  But ...   The AIs of the giant cybertanks soon learned the benefit of following creek beds and dried up (and even wet) river beds to keep their tracks submerged or in a 'gully' type position, safe from probing fire.  The tracks down in the trenches, as it were, proved harder to hit, easier to defend, and fewer tracks were lost in each typical attack due to most of the attack strength being soaked up by the nearby terrain and / or the prepared positions.  During the limited cease fire periods of peace, friendly construction units labored to create 'Tracks Down' defensive positions for resident OGREs.

A combat engineering unit must expend three (3) construction points per OGRE Mark level (thus to establish a 'Track Down' position for a Mark III OGRE, (9) nine construction points would have to be expended...) to create a 'Track Down' position for the OGRE.  OGREs can / may begin a scenario in a 'track Down' status if all players agree or according to scenario requirements / setup.  Attacks against an OGRE that is in a 'Track Down' defensive emplacement are conducted normally with the exception that all attacks against the treads of the OGRE are at 1/2 strength (or the defensive strength of the treads are doubled, whichever is greater) and any attack that succeeds only does half damage (thus if a heavy tank (attack strength of 4) were to successfully attack an OGRE in the "Tracks Down" position, only two tracks / treads would be destroyed (half attack strength)..  The OGRE must remain in place to maintain the 'Track Down' defensive advantage.  Once an OGRE leaves the prepared hex, it loses the "Tracks Down" advantage, but it may return to the hex and return to the prepared position by simply moving back into the hex and declaring that it is going "Tracks Down".   OGREs following creek or river beds may declare that they are "Tracks Down" while they remain in a hex or move through a hex that has a creek or river running through it.

Other armor units may not use a OGREs "Tracks Down" position for cover within the context of a scenario / this game.  Only OGREs of the same size class may share the use of a "Tracks Down" position.  That is, a Mark V OGRE could not move into and occupy a "Tracks Down" position previously occupied by a Mark III unit.

Defensive Position

Cost To Construct (construction points)

Modifications

OGRE "Tracks Down" Position

3 construction points per OGRE Mark

2x defensive strength of OGRE tracks
1/2 amount of tracks lost per attack on tracks

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HARDENED POSITIONS offer all friendly units in that hex to be treated as if they were in a town or city hex for defensive purposes due to much more extensive defensive constructions.  Normal stacking rules apply with regard to defensive build ups.  Only the normal amount of units allowed to 'stack' in a hex may receive the bonus.  This bonus is applied BEFORE any doubling of defense due to an overrun situation!  Units in a 'prepared' hex which leave that hex may return at any time and receive the bonus, as may the enemy if they occupy the hex with no friendlies present.  If friendly units occupying the hex are destroyed there, the hex is considered to be 'unprepared' again, due to the wreckage blocking the further use of the defensive constructions, etc.  A tank in a carefully prepared hull down position has an advantage, but if an enemy unit brews it up, the wreckage is not going to magically go away, and thus the defensive position would be 'choked' with the wreckage, and unusable by the enemy victor (unless they brought their own construction unit in and 'prepared' the hex assuming that they either build new emplacements or they simply tow the old wreckage away).

OGREs bigger than Mark II may NOT use Prepared or Hardened Positions.   OGREs bigger than Mark II size may only use a prepared or naturally occurring "Tracks Down" position.

The creation of defensive positions requires some form of additional paperwork, with the hex(s) so prepared being noted by the owner, and their condition constantly recorded when conditions warrant a change in their nature.  The enemy player may ask for the record of defensive positions at any time there is a dispute over the condition of a given hex.

Certain scenarios may offer a set amount of turns before hand for construction purposes, such as "Construction units may be assumed to have been operating for six turns beforehand with regard to the preparation of defensive positions and hardened emplacements.  The amount of construction time afforded before a scenario and even if such time is to be allowed should be mutually agreed upon by all players.

Defensive Position

Cost To Construct (construction points)

Modifications

Hardened Positions

24 construction points

2x armor unit defensive strength
3x Inf defense strength

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SUPERIOR ECM- All vehicles carried some form of ECM (Electronic Counter Measures) just to be able to survive on the 21CB.  ECM worked to 'spoof' or jam the enemy tracking and FATS system by flooding the enemy systems with thousands, even millions of 'fake' targets.  The time it took the enemy system to 'filter' out all the targets it 'saw' and decide on which was the 'real' target was not very long, but on the 21CB, that short amount of time could be the difference between making a kill and becoming a casualty of war.  The tide of ECM development was rapid, fluctuating wildly between both sides.  New methods of ECM were employed, and the opposing forces would learn how to counter them, leading to new methods being invented, and new countermeasures being deployed in a viscous see-saw of electronic warfare. 

To simulate one side having SUPERIOR ECM, simply increase the DEFENSE RATING of ALL FRIENDLY UNITS by one.  That means that a D4 unit will become a D5 unit FOR THE PERIOD OF THIS GAME ONLY.  A D2 unit will become a D3 unit FOR THE PERIOD OF THIS GAME ONLY.  The Superior ECM makes it harder for the enemy to track and acquire the target, thus the defense strength is enhanced.  This enhanced defense strength is applied to all friendly units, and is the NEW DEFENSE STRENGTH for the entire game.  Thus if a unit had a DEFENSE STRENGTH of 2, and it had SUPERIOR ECM, it would then have a DEFENSE STRENGTH of D3.  If this unit were to move into a town or city hex, its new DEFENSE STRENGTH would be 6 (doubled for city and town hexes), not 4, which it would normally be.  Scenarios which 'link' to one another must be agreed upon if the SUPERIOR ECM rule continues on in effect into the next scenario or if the opposing forces have deployed a countermeasure.  If the other side deploys a successful countermeasure to SUPERIOR ECM, then all counter values revert to their normal, unadjusted values.

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SUPERIOR ECCM-  The countermeasure to ECM was ECCM, or Electronic Counter Counter Measures.  ECCM worked to 'burn' through ECM being generated by the target, to clear away the electronic defense of the target and enhance the friendly units own targeting system(s).  Units equipped with SUPERIOR ECCM suites are able to acquire the enemy targets faster and to do more damage (the lock is more precise, the target becomes easier to hit thus insuring a better chance at a 'hard kill' shot, etc.).  The tide of ECCM development was just as rapid as that of ECM development.  The 21CB was a information and electronics intensive conflict, with new developments fluctuating wildly between both sides certainly on a weekly basis, sometimes daily, sometimes even overnight!  As new methods of ECM were employed by both sides, the opposing forces would have to quickly learn how to counter them using ECCM, leading to new methods being invented, and new countermeasures being deployed in a viscous see-saw of electronic warfare. 

To simulate one side having SUPERIOR ECCM, simply decrease the DEFENSE RATING of ALL ENEMY UNITS by one.  That means that a D4 unit will become a D3 unit FOR THE PERIOD OF THIS GAME / SCENARIO ONLY.  A D2 enemy unit will become a D1 enemy unit FOR THE PERIOD OF THIS GAME ONLY.  The Superior ECCM makes it easier for the friendly units to track and acquire the enemy target, thus the defense strength is decreased.  This decreased defense strength is applied to all ENEMY units, and is the NEW DEFENSE STRENGTH for the entire game.  Thus if a unit had a DEFENSE STRENGTH of 2, and it was facing an enemy unit which had SUPERIOR ECCM, it would then have a DEFENSE STRENGTH of D1.  If this unit were to move into a town or city hex, its new DEFENSE STRENGTH would be 2 (doubled for city and town hexes), not 4, which it would normally be.   Scenarios which 'link' to one another must be agreed upon if the SUPERIOR ECCM rule continues on in effect into the next scenario or if the opposing forces have deployed a countermeasure.  If the other side deploys a successful countermeasure to SUPERIOR ECCM, then all counter values revert to their normal, unadjusted values.

It is possible that one side could have both SUPERIOR ECM and SUPERIOR ECCM (as was the case with the Combine's RDF battalion at Jordan...) in which case that side would increase the DEFENSE STRENGTH of all of their units by ONE (1), while all the enemy units would decrease their DEFENSE STRENGTH by ONE (1) for the duration of the game / scenario.

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