_____________________________________________
UNOFFICIAL CHANGES TO OFFICIAL RULES
 

Ogrecover-sm.jpg (17132 bytes)

OGRE (tm) RULE CHANGES

2.00    MAPSHEET

2.011    Craters.  There are two types of craters in the game; hot craters and cool craters representing the relative level of radiation that is present in each terrain featureHot craters are still very much radioactive and will probably be "fresh" by a few hours at the least (or a day or two at the most)Hot craters are impassable to any armor or infantry unit except an OGRE which treats them as a clear hex for movement and defense purposes.  The OGRE must expend one movement point to enter a hot craterCool craters are left from previous bombardment and have little or no residual radiation (as far as actual game play is concerned).  Cool craters are able to be crossed by all units at a cost of one movement point.  A cool crater hex is treated in all other aspects as a clear hex for movement and defense purposes.  Only an OGRE may enter a hot crater or stay there.  Any unit may enter or stay in a cool crater.  All units may fire over at units on the other side of a crater or may fire into the crater at units occupying the crater space, regardless of crater type.  The small cracks around a crater do not affect movement or defense.

3.015     Mobile Infantry (MI)Mobile Infantry represent soldiers who have been trained in the use of and equipped with an advance suit of powered battle armor.  These counters come in three designations, representing one, two or three individual combat ready soldiers.  Each 1/1 infantry counter represents a single soldier who is armed with a variety of high tech, "smart" anti-personnel and "brilliant" anti-tank weapons, close in support systems, tactical recon drones, extensive digital system integration and advanced communication with other friendly units.  The advanced powered battlesuit greatly increases each soldier"s physical strength, endurance and mobility as well as provides a good degree of protection from shrapnel.  The sealed suit is further proof against most nuclear, biological, and chemical agents and provides sustenance for up to a week at a time.   The scenario setups refer to any available infantry in terms of "infantry strength points" representing the total attack strength of the MI units; one 3/1 infantry counter equals three infantry strength / attack points or three soldiers (a squad)A 2/1 infantry counter represents a fireteam composed of two individual soldiers.  A single infantry strength point is equivalent to one individual MI soldier as well as their attendant weapons and equipment.  During the Last War, MI on both sides were comprised of men and women.  The Combine MI were generally better trained, more coordinated and had access to better equipment.  The Paneuropeans had more battlesuits but these were not of the same quality as the Combine units.  Paneuropean soldiers also suffered from less effective training and coordination.  What technological advantages the Combine enjoyed among their soldiers, the Paneuropeans tried to make up for on the battlefield by using sheer numbers.

5.00    MOVEMENT

5.021     Combining Infantry-  The basic infantry counter is the 1/1 counter (representing one soldier and one point of power suited mobile infantry attack strength).  Two or three 1-soldier counters, or a two soldier and a one soldier counter may occupy a hex together, since they are still the equivalent of a 3 soldier counter / group.   Infantry soldiers operating in the same hex combine together. increasing both their attack strength and defense factor using highly specialized electronics and software known as SLICS (Squad Level Integration and Countermeasures System).  This uplink is done on the fly and is integrated completely into the operation of the individual suits.  No further record keeping or paperwork is required.  Thus a pair of 1-1 D1 infantry soldiers move into the same hex and begin operating together.  They combine to become a single cohesive 2-1 D2 infantry unit. If another soldier were to link up with the 2-1 D2 infantry unit, the new three soldier infantry unit ("squad") would have a rating of 3-1 D3.  The squad may unlink at any time and new soldiers may link up to old groups as long as no more than three soldiers are linked at any one time.  A soldier automatically unlinks (and thus reverts back to its 1/1, D1 designation) if it moves away from the group or leaves the same hex as the linked group.

5.031    Results of ramming armor units.     Any immobile armor unit (i.e. a Howitzer or any disabled unit) is automatically destroyed if rammed.  Any armor unit rammed may be able to move out of the way (at the last possible instant) on a roll of 1, it is disabled on a roll of 2-3 and destroyed on a roll of 4-6.  If the unit was a GEV, it would be able to evade on a roll of 1-2, is disabled on a roll of 3-4 and destroyed on a roll or 5-6.  The player initiating the ram rolls the die immediately upon ramming.   If the armor unit is only disabled by the ram, the OGRE may expend one more movement point, stay in that hex, and ram the unit again or it may attack it with one of its remaining, unused weapons.

Units which "move out of the way" at the last second do not physically move out of the hex, they have merely dodged to one side or the other as the Ogre rumbled along, stepping aside from the path of the onrushing juggernaut.

An Ogre loses tread units equal to the defensive strength of the unit which is rammed, but only if the unit is destroyed in the ram.  If the unit is disabled, the Ogre loses no treads.  If an Ogre rams a disabled unit (thus destroying it), it does not lose any treads in the process.

Example: A Mark III Ogre moves from hex 0308 to hex 0207 and rams a heavy tank.  The die is rolled and the result is a "1" meaning that the heavy tank just barely managed to evade the charging Ogre.  The heavy tank is not moved from hex 0207, it stays there (though its position inside the hex, relative to where it started, will have changed considerably but this has no bearing on the actual mechanics of the game...).  The Ogre player still has one movement point left and decides to stay in the hex and try to ram the heavy tank again.  The die is rolled and comes up a five, meaning that the heavy tank has been rammed and destroyed (flattened under the Ogre"s treads...).  The Ogre loses 3 tread units in this action (the defensive strength of the heavy tank).

5.0311 (OPTIONAL RULE)- Disabling OGRE Treads- This rule provides more realism but also requires more bookkeeping.  Any time that an OGRE rams an enemy unit (D1 or greater including hardened CPs), its treads immediately undergo a 1:1 attack.  Roll a die to resolve the attack.  Treat a "NE" results in no treads lost. On a "D" result, the amount of treads that would normally be lost to a ram attack are instead disabled and unavailable for movement this turn or the following turn.  This represents the drive motors going off-line, the treads getting locked on their rollers, or debris getting caught in the treads.  These treads are not available for motive power this turn or the next but will return to use / recover from being disabled during the 2nd GEV movement phase of the turn after the treads were disabled.  Disabling treads may temporarily lower the number of movement points available to the OGRE.  Treat all "X" results as normal damage to the treads.  Treads lost to an "X" result are destroyed and do not recover normally.

6.091     Infantry Multiple Attacks Allowed.  An infantry group (two or more infantry strength points) operating as a larger group may break down its attack strength into separate attacks among different targets if so desired as long as the attacks are carried out in whole numbers only.  A 2/1 D2 infantry unit could, therefore, attack one target as a 2/1 attack, or attack two different targets each single 1/1 strength attacks.  Infantry are the only elements which may do this (unless otherwise specifically noted).   In essence, each soldier in a multi squad infantry group can attack the same or a different target if so desired.  The electronics and software described in rule 5.021 above accounts for this.  The lowest attack factor must always be a whole number, fractions or percentages are not allowed.  No attack factor can be divided into anything less than a whole number.  As an example, a 1/1 D1 infantry squad could only attack one target at 1/1 strength.  It could not divide its attack strength into, say, two one half point attacks.  On the other hand, an integrated three soldier infantry group (3/1 D3) could, if the owing player chose to, make three different 1/1 attacks, or a 2/1 and a 1/1 attack, or one single 3/1 attack in a single turn so long as no more than 3 attack factors were used in total.  Attack factors which are not used during the turn may not be saved up for use in later turns, they must be used each turn or they are "lost".

Ogrecover-sm.jpg (17132 bytes)

GEV(tm) RULE CHANGES

3.00     COUNTERS

3.018     Mobile Infantry (MI)Mobile Infantry represent soldiers who have been trained in the use of and equipped with an advance suit of powered battle armor.  These counters come in three designations, representing one, two or three individual combat ready soldiers.  Each 1/1 infantry counter represents a single soldier who is armed with a variety of high tech, "smart" anti-personnel and "brilliant" anti-tank weapons, close in support systems, tactical recon drones, extensive digital system integration and advanced communication with other friendly units.  The advanced powered battlesuit greatly increases each soldier's physical strength, endurance and mobility as well as provides a good degree of protection from shrapnel.  The sealed suit is further proof against most nuclear, biological, and chemical agents and provides sustenance for up to a week at a time.   The scenario setups refer to any available infantry in terms of "infantry strength points" representing the total attack strength of the MI units; one 3/1 infantry counter equals three infantry strength / attack points or three soldiers (a squad)A 2/1 infantry counter represents a fire team composed of two individual soldiers.  A single infantry strength point is equivalent to one individual MI soldier as well as their attendant weapons and equipment.  During the Last War, MI on both sides were comprised of men and women.  The Combine MI were generally better trained, more coordinated and had access to better equipment.  The Paneuropeans had more battlesuits but these were not of the same quality as the Combine units.  Paneuropean soldiers also suffered from less effective training and coordination.  What technological advantages the Combine enjoyed among their soldiers, the Paneuropeans tried to make up for on the battlefield by using sheer numbers.

5.021     Combining Infantry-  The basic infantry counter is the 1/1 counter (representing one soldier and one point of power suited mobile infantry attack strength).  Two or three 1-soldier counters, or a two soldier and a one soldier counter may occupy a hex together, since they are still the equivalent of a 3 soldier counter / group.   Infantry soldiers operating in the same hex combine together both their attack strength and defense factor using highly specialized electronics and software known as SLICS (Squad Level Integration and Countermeasures System).  This uplink is done on the fly and is integrated completely into the operation of the individual suits.  No further record keeping or paperwork is required.  Thus a pair of 1-1 D1 infantry soldiers move into the same hex and begin operating together.  They combine to become a single cohesive 2-1 D2 infantry unit. If another soldier were to link up with the 2-1 D2 infantry unit, the new three soldier infantry unit ("squad") would have a rating of 3-1 D3.  The squad may unlink at any time and new soldiers may link up to old groups as long as no more than three soldiers are linked at any one time.  A soldier automatically unlinks (and thus reverts back to its 1/1, D1 designation) if it moves away from the group or leaves the same hex as the linked group.

5.11     Infantry riding tanks.  Infantry (of any type) may not "hitch a ride" on friendly armor units or OGRES unless that unit is specifically designed to carry or transport infantry.  Infantry riding on armored vehicles would interfere with the active and passive defense systems of these vehicles.   Infantry may mount and dismount from dedicated infantry transports subject to rule 5.111 below.

5.111    Mount / dismount sequencing for transported infantry.   For an infantry unit to mount or dismount from a transport capable of carrying infantry, the infantry unit must begin the turn in the same hex as the transporting unit.   Both units remain in the hex for the entire turn.  The infantry unit may dismount any time thereafter, on that turn or a later turn, but may not move "on its own" on the turn that it dismounts.  It may fire normally on the turn it dismounts.

5.112   Dismounted infantry that are overrun.  (see 6.13) Dismounted infantry that are overrun during the turn that they dismount operate normally for purposes of combat during an overrun situation.

5.113    Effects of damage on transported infantry.     Infantry that are being transported are considered destroyed if their transport is destroyed.  If they dismount and their transport is destroyed on the same turn that they dismount, they suffer no damage.  If infantry mount a transport which is destroyed in the same turn that they mount, the infantry unit is also destroyed along with the transport.

5.114    Infantry attacks while being transported.     Unless specifically stated as being able to do such, infantry being transported cannot attack or defend while being transported, nor do they combine their attack and / or defense strength in any way with the transporting unit or any other infantry units being transported by the same unit.  Infantry in separate transports in the same hex may not combine until both units wishing to combine have dismounted from their transports.  Transported infantry do not combine with other infantry, even if they are in the same hex, unless they dismount first.  They may combine with other infantry units in the same hex on the turn after they dismount.


6.00     COMBAT

6.113    Water.  An infantry unit in a water hex may attack normally (their weapons are designed to work in many different extreme environments); double their defense strength when they are in water ("water" in this instance is counted as deep river and lake or ocean hexes, not simple streams).  Infantry do not "swim" while moving in water hexes (a difficult feat to do while wearing 1500 plus kilograms of equipment and battlesuit!), instead mobile infantry "walk" along the bottom (albeit slowly), walking into rivers, along the bottom, and then up and out on the other side.  OGREs in deep water hexes roll along the bed, following the contours (and churning up quite a bit of mud and debris).  OGREs moving along the bottom of a river or lake are easy to spot by their tell-tale wake.  Infantry are much harder to spot, especially if they are on low emissions operations.  Friendly infantry meeting enemy infantry underwater may engage freely in overrun combat if the two units enter the same hex.  Infantry may engage in overrun combat with enemy OGRE units traveling underwater and vice versa.  Infantry moving underwater may not engage in overrun combat with any other unit except enemy infantry or enemy OGRE units that are moving underwater.

6.134    OGRE overrun rules.  Refer to rule (5.031) above under OGRE RULEBOOK CHANGES to find rules for ramming and damage.  An OGRE may ram one enemy unit during each fire round of an overrun situation.  An OGRE loses tread units based on the defensive strength of the enemy unit rammed.  Ramming a D0 CP in an overrun does not cause the OGRE to lose tread units.  An OGRE may not ram infantry of any kind.  If an OGRE rams a unit carrying infantry (like a GEV-PC) and successfully destroys the transport then the infantry it was transporting are destroyed at the same time.  If damage is called for then the OGRE loses tread units equal to the defensive strength of the transport, not the transport plus the infantry carried.  The infantry being transported have no effect on the number of lost of treads.

6.137    "Overrun" situations on water hexes.   GEVs are unaffected by water.  OGREs and infantry can enter water hexes and can attack normally while there.  GEVs may sometimes overrun OGREs or Infantry in the water, or vice versa.  GEVs can attack OGREs moving underwater as well as infantry moving underwater.  Overruns between underwater infantry and GEVs are possible.  All OGRE and Infantry weapons work normally while submerged.  OGREs and Infantry that are submerged and moving along the bottom of the river or lake may be attacked normally by any unit in range.  No unit HAS to overrun while it is in the water, but any unit may initiate overrun combat if it chooses to do so.  If both units wish to ignore each other by mutual player choice, this is allowed.


8.00    OPTIONAL RULES

8.03    Destruction of town hexes.    See rule 8.06 for clarification on this procedure.

8.06    Turning town and forest hexes to rubble.  A town, city, or forest hex is turned to rubble after any attack or combination of attacks totaling 100 strength points has been directed against the hex or units in the hex.  Spillover fire and overrun attacks counts as full effect in regards to this with particular attention paid to OGRE weapons which cause double damage during overrun attacks.  Infantry cannot reduce a town or forest hex to rubble as their weapons are simply too light and specialized to cause wide spread damage over a large area.

8.061    Damage to forest, town or city hexes is cumulative and partial damage should be noted on a scratch piece of paper with the simple notation of hex number and points of damage accumulated toward the total required of rule 8.06 above.

8.1    OGRE Rampage-  OGREs are the premiere city siege and urban assault weapon employed during The Last War

8.1a    Destruction of roadways and rails-    An OGRE of Mark III or larger automatically cuts a road or rail hex whenever it moves across it. 

8.1b    Destruction of standard bridges - OGREs of Mark III or larger size class can knock down a standard bridge by expending one movement point and announcing that the bridge has been destroyed.  Roll a die for each bridge destroyed in this manner.  If the OGRE rolls its size class or below on 1D6, then it suffers no damage in the destruction of the bridge.  If the die roll is higher than the size of the OGRE, roll 1d6 and apply this amount as damage to the OGRE's treads.

8.1c    An OGRE may elect to destroy a city, town or forest hex (reducing it to rubble status) simply by remaining in the hex, expending one movement point and rampaging.  Each city, town, or forest hex requires ten turns to reduce to rubble, divided by the size of the OGRE and rounded up.  Thus, a Mark V OGRE could reduce a city, town or forest hex to rubble in two turns (10 divided by 5 = 2).  It would take a Mark IV three turns (10 divided by 4 = 2.5 rounded up to 3).  It would take a Mark II five whole turns to accomplish this and a Mark I OGRE would require ten turns to accomplish this feat.


9.04    THE TRAIN

9.0450    Armed-train variation.  The train owner may give up from one to four armor units in the beginning selection phase.  For each armor unit given up, the train owner may put either one 4/2 battery on each hex of the train, two 2/2 batteries on each train hex, two AP batteries per train hex, or a 3/4 missile battery on each hex.  The train owner could place one 4/2 battery and one missile launcher, if they so desired, or a 4/2 battery and two 2/2 batteries, or any combination desired.

9.0451    Armored-train variation.    The train owner may give up two armor units in the beginning selection phase in order to give the train a defense of D4.  This represents extra point defense systems, dedicated countermeasures, sophisticated electronics, and additional armor plating to enhance the train's survival.

9.0452    Armed and Armored Train variation.  The train owner may upgrade the train to both an armored and armed variant by paying the associated costs found in rules 9.0450 and 9.0451 above.

9.0453    Units being transported by train.     Armored units may be loaded onto special reinforced flat bed "low boy" train cars and transported along rails to different areas of the map at far greater speed than they normally could reach those areas under their own means.  For each hex of train, up to 6 armor units and up to 15 points of infantry may be transported.  To mount the train, the train must be completely stopped.  Units may enter a train hex at any point in their movement but must end their movement there if they wish to board the train.  On the next turn, the unit is considered to be loaded onto the train securely.  Up to six armor units and up to 15 infantry units may be loaded on the train per hex of train per turn subject to the above conditions.  Once all units that desire to be loaded are loaded, the train may resume movement on the turn following the turn when the last unit was loaded.  The train may, if it is armed, attack and defend normally while units are being loaded.

9.0454     Infantry Hopping Onto Moving Trains.    Infantry may try to "hop aboard" a train that is moving.   This is automatically successful if the train is moving M2 or slower and the train is friendly.  For each extra movement point that the train is traveling in excess of the capacity of the infantry (M2), the infantry unit will undergo a strength one attack on the CRT, even if the train and infantry belong to the same  player.  Thus if the infantry (M2) were trying to hop onto a train moving M5, they would undergo a (M5-M2) 3:1 attack on the CRT.  Any "NE" result means that the attempt was successful.  A "D" result means that the attempt was unsuccessful and the infantry unit ends its movement in the hex of the train that they were trying to board.  A "X" result eliminates the infantry unit with no damage to the train.  

If the train belongs to the enemy and it is armed it may attack the infantry in an overrun situation if it still has attack strength left to do so.  If the enemy train is armed with AP batteries, these may be used to defend against the enemy infantry.  Infantry may hop off of a moving train at no penalty regardless of train speed (their jets can slow their landing...) but end their movement for the turn in the hex adjacent to either side or the immediate rear of the train.   They may attack and defend normally as soon as they exit the train but they cannot begin to move normally until the following turn.

9.0455    Attacking units being transported by train.     Armor and infantry units that are "riding" the train may both attack and defend normally (they are on flatbed cars) as well as be attacked normally.  The defense value of the train does not apply to any transported units, just the train itself.   If a unit being transported by a train is attacked and spillover fire is determined, then all units being transported in that hex of train undergo spillover fire.   If the front hex of the train is destroyed, all units being carried by the train and the other hexes of train undergo an immediate 1:1 attack on the CRT.  Disabled units are left disabled in the hex of the train wreck.  If the second or another hex of the train is destroyed then only units being transported in that hex undergo attack on the CRT.  Infantry in a "destroyed section" may attempt a last second "hop off" from the train as the train is destroyed under them.  Any infantry that do so land in the same hex as the destroyed train section and suffer an immediate 1:2 attack, being eliminated on either a "D" or an "X" in this instance. If the infantry unit survives, the unit follows all rules as if they had dismounted from a infantry transport capable unit (see 5.111 above).

9.0456    Dismounting armor units from the train.  To unload transported armor units from the train, the train must come to a complete stop.   On the turn after the train comes to a complete stop, up to six armor units may disembark from the train in that turn.  These units are placed in the same hex as the train hex that they were transported in (space permitting, a single counter may be used to represent multiple units).  These units may attack and defend normally.  On the next turn, they may move normally.

9.0455    Dismounting Infantry from the train.     To unload transported infantry units from the train, the train must come to a complete stop.  On the turn after the train comes to a complete stop, up to 15 points of infantry may disembark from the train in that turn.  Mobile Infantry may otherwise dismount the train at any time at any speed that is within their movement limits.  That is, if the train is moving at M2, an infantry unit may "hop off" the train subject to rule (5.111).  If the train is moving faster than M2, for each additional hex of speed, the infantry unit will suffer a 1 point attack on the CRT.  Thus, if the train were moving at M5, and a infantry unit hopped off the train, it would immediately undergo a 3:1 attack.  If the train had been moving at M3, it would only undergo a 1:1 attack.   If the train is moving at M2 or M1, then the infantry may dismount and suffer no penalty.  Infantry that dismount at any speed (including M0) may be placed in the same hex as the train segment they were being transported on, or in any adjacent hex and are subject to normal infantry dismounting rules (see 5.111 above).

 

shockwave.jpg (15614 bytes)

SHOCKWAVE(tm) SUPPLEMENT CHANGES

3.00 COUNTERS

3.012 Missile Crawler- This counter represents a single super heavy tracked vehicle carrying either a single standard Cruise Missile or a pair of smaller Light Cruise Missiles (see Section 4.00).  It has two AP batteries which function for all purposes in the same way as the AP batteries on SUPERHEAVY TANKS or OGRES do (see below).  The crawler attacks by firing its missile or its dual AP batteries (1/1 against D0 or infantry targets only).  The crawler may combine the two AP batteries against a single target or split the attacks between two different targets.  The crawler has a defensive strength of 2 and a movement value of 1.  After it has fired its missile payload, movement allowance rises to 2.  It is affected by terrain as thought it were a super heavy tank.  When a player chooses units at the beginning of a scenario, each missile crawler is worth 3 armor units.

3.014 GEV-PC.  This counter represents a GEV personnel carrier.   It has an attack strength of 2, a range of 2, and a defensive strength of 2.   It has a movement value of 4/3- that is, 4 hexes in the first movement phase and 3 in the second movement phase.  It is affected by terrain as though it were a standard GEV.  When a player chooses units at the beginning of a scenario, each GEV-PC is considered one and a half armor units, that is it would take a player 3 armor points to buy two GEV-PCs.  A GEV-PC can carry three infantry strength points of MI or one strength point of Militia (see Battlefields supplement).  See GEV Section 5.11 for movement and combat rules used when infantry ride armored vehicles.

3.017 Truck.  This counter represents a single large truck, unarmed and mostly unarmored.  It has no attack strength.  The Truck has a defense strength of 0- if attacked, it is automatically destroyed.  A truck in a town hex, and / or undergoing a spillover attack or overrun attack has a defense strength of 1 for that situation only.  A truck, being a wheeled vehicle, has its own set of terrain effects.  It has 4 movement points.  It pays one point to enter a road hex, 2 to enter a town hex without a road or a clear terrain hex, and 4 points to enter any other type of terrain hex.  It may not enter swamp, river, or water hexes.  It pays 4 movement points to enter a rubble or debris hex.  A truck costs 1/5 of an armor point for purchase at the beginning of a scenario.

3.0171 Armed TruckThis counter represents a single large truck, lightly armed and mostly unarmored.  It sacrifices some cargo capacity to mount a dedicated 1/1 AP weapon intended for defense against infantry and D0 targets only.  The armed truck is a military transport though similar units were found in militia forces.  The Armed Truck has a defense strength of 0- if attacked, it is automatically destroyed.  A truck in a town hex, and / or undergoing a spillover attack or overrun attack has a defense strength of 1 for that situation only.  A truck, being a wheeled vehicle, has its own set of terrain effects.  It has 4 movement points.  It pays one point to enter a road hex, 2 to enter a town hex without a road or a clear terrain hex, and 4 points to enter any other type of terrain hex.  It may not enter swamp, river, or water hexes.  It pays 4 movement points to enter a rubble or debris hex.  An armed truck costs 1/4 of an armor point for purchase at the beginning of a scenario.

3.018 Hovertruck Also known as a G.E.T. or Ground Effect Transport.  This counter represents a single large cargo hovercraft, unarmed and mostly unarmored.  It has no attack strength.  The Hovertruck has a defense strength of 0- if attacked, it is automatically destroyed.   A Hovertruck in a town hex, and / or undergoing a spillover attack or overrun attack has a defense strength of 1 for that situation only.  A Hovertruck has a movement value of 3/2, that is, 3 movement points in the first GEV phase and two movement points in the second GEV phase.  A hover truck costs 1/4 of an armor point for purchase at the beginning of a scenario.

3.0181 Armed HovertruckAlso known as an A.G.E.T. or Armed Ground Effect Transport.  This counter represents a single large cargo hovercraft, lightly armed and mostly unarmored.  It sacrifices some cargo capacity to mount a dedicated 1/1 AP weapon intended for defense against infantry and D0 targets only.  It is a military transport though similar models were also seen among various militia units.  The armed hovertruck mounts .  The Hovertruck has a defense strength of 0- if attacked, it is automatically destroyed.   A Hovertruck in a town hex, and / or undergoing a spillover attack or overrun attack has a defense strength of 1 for that situation only.  A Hovertruck has a movement value of 3/2, that is, 3 movement points in the first GEV phase and two movement points in the second GEV phase.  An Armed Hovertruck truck costs 1/3 of an armor point for purchase at the beginning of a scenario.

3.02 Infantry riding new units.  As per GEV section 5.11, infantry units may hitch a ride on certain faster units.  New units which can carry infantry and the number of squads they can carry, are: GEV-PC (1 squad), Truck (1 squad), Hovertruck (1 squad).  Note that infantry riding a Truck or Hovertruck are assumed to be riding inside, and cannot use their weapons until they dismount. 

3.031    Strongpoint-   This counter represents a specially fortified and complex bunker system.  (For more detailed rules, see section 5.00 BUILDINGS below).

3.031    Infantry Barracks- Strongpoints are composed of a modular building design.  They are used to house large amounts of troops and to act as "fortresses"  It can hold one SP of infantry per 2 structure points it possesses.  Infantry may enter or leave the strongpoint by expending one movement point.  This places them "on top of" the strongpoint at which point they may then move normally.

3.0312    Armored Bay- For every 5 structure points that a strongpoint possesses, it may also "dock" internally one armor point of vehicle inside the structure.  This armor unit may not be attacked nor may it attack normally.  Units inside a strongpoint at the beginning of a scenario may be "hidden" from the other players and not detected.  These units are only detected when they actually leave the strongpoint.  Units stored inside a strongpoint may not be attacked separately nor may they attack while inside the strongpoint.

3.0313   Collapsing Strongpoints-  When strongpoints reach zero structure points, they collapse.   All infantry and vehicle units still inside a strongpoint that collapses undergoes a 2:1 attack on the CRT.  A "NE" result allows the unit to escape the collapse and that unit is placed in the same hex as the collapsed strongpoint.  A "D" result buries the unit for a short time but the crew may be able to extricate the vehicle under its own power or by using tools found in most vehicle inventories.  Treat the vehicle as being disabled, it may recover normally as if it had been disabled in combat.  Any "X" result removes the vehicle from play, it is either so buried that it is unable to be used this scenario or it has simply been crushed beneath the tons of falling debris.  Units destroyed as a result of the collapse of a strongpoint count immediately as victory points for the opposing force.  Any units which escape the collapse are assumed to expend one movement point in doing so and are placed "on top of" the strongpoint.

3.0314   Strongpoint Size- Strongpoints come in many sizes, the initial structure point rating is decided upon before the scenario begins.  The smallest is 10sp in size.  There is no limit (for practical game purposes) on how large a strong point may be.

3.0351    Reactor Meltdown- A reactor that is damaged to 6 or less SP runs the risk of a catastrophic meltdown.  Each turn, the player owning the reactor rolls one die.  If the roll is equal to or less than the SP remaining, the reactor still functions normally.  If the roll is greater than the SP remaining, then a meltdown is immanent.  Roll one d6 and record the number.  This is the number of turns before the reactor goes critical.

3.0352    Reactor Explosion- A reactor that goes critical explodes with enough force to devastate the entire hex.  Use rule 4.04 of Shockwave for the detonation of a cruise missile to represent the force of an exploding nuclear reactor.

3.0353    Shutting Down The Reactor- Engineer units (only) may enter the reactor building at any point before actual detonation of the reactor core, even during the turns when a meltdown is occurring and a detonation is immanent.  Up to three engineering squads at a time may enter the reactor building and attempt to shut down the reactor before it goes critical.   Total up the number of SP of engineer squads that have entered the reactor building and then roll one die.  If the die roll is equal to or less than the total number of engineer squads present, the reactor has been safely shut down and there is no danger of a meltdown.  Any other result is no effect.  Only one attempt to shut down the reactor may be made per turn per squad present (so if three squads were present, either one roll could be made for all three squads or each squad could make a separate roll).  Engineering squads still in the reactor when it goes critical are lost and count immediately as victory points for the opposing player.

4.00 CRUISE MISSILES

4.01 Background- Strategic sized weapons are rare on the battlefield, but they do have their uses.   City busting, and taking out large columns of armor, or as a pre-emptive strike against a enemy line in preparation for a large push, all are opportunities provided by the sheer power of strategic grade nuclear weapons, weapons that can only be delivered by the larger battlefield missiles.

4.011 Types of Cruise Missiles-  There are two types of Cruise Missiles portrayed in the game; light and standard.  Light cruise missiles carry smaller warheads but are cheaper and easier to deploy.  Standard cruise missiles carry the largest warheads and are the most effective, but likewise are also the costliest and hardest to deploy.  Light cruise missiles operate exactly as standard cruise missiles unless otherwise stated as operating differently.

4.032  Attack Odds-  Light cruise missiles do not carry the extensive electronics that the larger standard cruise missiles do, therefore, add an additional +1 to any roll, including all other modifiers, when trying to intercept a light cruise missile.

4.04 Detonation- Use the following table for the detonation of a light cruise missile.

EFFECTS OF LIGHT CRUISE MISSILE EXPLOSION

  RESULTS

UNIT TYPE

X 4-1 2-1 1-1 1-2 NE
Any D0 unit or any GEV 1 2 3 4 - 5+
D1 armor unit or CP 1 - 2 3 4 5+
D2 armor unit or CP 0 1 2 3 - 4+
D3+ armor unit, train, or CP 0 0 1 2 - 3+
Infantry (each squad) 0 - 1 2 - 3+
Town or forest hex 2 3 4 5 - 6+
Road, railroad, or bridge 0 - 1 - 1 2+
OGRE (each component) 0 - 1 - 1 2+
Building (less than 20sp) 0 - 1 - 1 2+
Building (21 to 50sp) 0 - - 1 - 1+
Building (51+sp) 0 - - - 1 1+

4.036 Cruise Missile Silo.  This structure represents a long term, hardened and well prepared cruise missile launch site built mostly underground with hardened launch facilities, command and control center, and underground protected missile storage bays.  Any number of cruise missiles may be stored at this facility but each must be purchased separately.  The Cruise Missile Silo has 30 structure points and can launch one cruise missile per turn.  When it reaches 10SP, it cannot launch anymore cruise missiles, but is not counted for victory points until it is completely destroyed (0 SP).  It has a defense of 4 due to dedicated point defense systems and electronic counter measures which exist at the installation itself.  When the Cruise Missile Silo is destroyed, any un-launched cruise missiles contained at the silo are also considered destroyed and count as victory points (they are buried so deep under so much rubble that the enemy is probably not going to bother with digging them out again).  These destroyed cruise missiles have no chance to detonate as per rule 4.033.  Only one cruise missile silo may be placed per hex.  Cruise Missile Silos can be placed in any hex except river, swamp, water, or a crater hex.  Cruise Missile Silos placed in town or city hexes benefit from the defense bonuses of those hexes.  Cruise missile silos which are owned by the same player may be "linked" by underground rail system for the transport of missiles.  If one silo is no longer able to fire missiles, any remaining missiles at that silo may be transferred to another silo via underground transport rail tube at a rate of up to 2 missiles per turn.  The underground transport system has a speed of two hexes per turn, and it will take an additional two turns once the missiles arrive to remove them from the transport system and load them into the launch system at the secondary launch site.

4.037 The Noble SacrificeIf an OGRE decides to sacrifice itself, it may drive onto the silo and park itself over the launch port.  If the silo owning player fires any cruise missiles, they explode immediately.  The OGRE immediately ends movement, takes 10D6 damage to its treads and suffers an immediate 2:1 attack against each of its components.  The installation immediately suffers 5d6 worth of damage.  The explosion is limited to the single hex and there is no spillover effect.  Only Mark III or larger OGRES may park on top of and block the launching of cruise missiles in this manner.  Even if the silo is capable of launching cruise missiles, the OGRE (or the wreckage of the OGRE) must still be removed from the launch port.  Small problem.  In any case, the silo is out of commission for the rest of the game.

Cruise missile silos may be attacked by infantry according to Section 5.00 below, BUILDINGS.

4.07 VP value of missiles- Strategic missiles are expensive.  When a light cruise missile is expended the opposing player scores 6 VP. When a standard cruise missile is expended, the opposing player scores 12 VP.

5.00 BUILDINGS

5.01 General- The CP units in Ogre and GEV represent small, modular structures, protected mostly with ECM / ECCM and perhaps a few inches of BPC or a few feet of earth thrown up around a prepared, dug in position.  The town hexes are assumed to consist of ordinary wood and brick buildings as well as contemporary glass, cement and steel structures.  A large structure, built from steel or alloys and reinforced with concrete or pourstone can be constructed to withstand severe damage, and may be as heavily armored or even more so than an OGRE!  These structures are far sturdier than anything else represented in the game and as such, no single attack with anything less than a Cruise Missile will destroy such a structure.

5.011  Entering and Leaving Buildings- Any infantry unit (MI, Militia, Marine, Engineer, etc.) may expend one movement point to  enter or leave either an unoccupied building, or a building occupied by a friendly unit.  If the building is occupied by a enemy infantry unit, the friendly infantry unit may try to enter the building, initiating an overrun attack immediately (see rule 5.013 below).

5.012  Using Buildings As Cover-  Each building may hold one strength point of infantry per 5 structure points of building capacity.  This does not count towards any stacking limits per hex normally enforced regardless of how many infantry occupy each building within a specific hex.  Thus a building with 10 structure points could accommodate two single infantry squads or a 2/1 strength infantry unit.  Armor units may not use buildings as cover or enter buildings at all unless otherwise noted.  Any infantry within a building may not be targeted individually.  Infantry inside of a building do not take damage from any attack, such damage is absorbed by the building in turn, until the building itself has had its structure points decreased to zero.  When the building reaches zero structure points, it collapses doing a 1:1 attack on any infantry units inside.  Infantry may enter or leave a building at any time, expending one movement point to do so.  Infantry inside of a building have the same defensive bonuses as the terrain that the building is located in and other than the building's ability to absorb damage normally intended for the infantry unit itself, offers no other defense.

As a building takes damage, its ability to accommodate infantry also decreases.   The number of infantry units which may occupy a building is determined at the beginning of each turn.  Any excess units beyond the building's capacity (due to damage or other actions) must leave immediately.  These units are placed "on top of" the building but do not have to expend a movement point to do so (their cover was blown away from them by the damage, opening them back up to the outside).

5.013  Assaulting Held Buildings-  A vacant building may be claimed by any infantry unit regardless of player side, up to the maximum capacity of the building as determined by rule 5.011.   If an enemy unit is currently occupying the building, a friendly unit trying to enter the building initiates an overrun attack immediately.  In an overrun attack between infantry contesting ownership of the building, both the infantry units and the building itself takes damage.  This represents the bitter reality of room clearing and other urban warfare tactics.  During an overrun attack by infantry against enemy infantry inside a building, take the sum total of all squads involved and apply this as damage to the building towards the capacity of its structure points.  Do this before resolving any attack outcome of the infantry assault.  If the attack is successful, then the attacking infantry unit automatically moves into the building to occupy it.

5.014 Lending Support Fire To Assaults-  Units with AP batteries may lend this type of weapons fire to the assault, adding directly to the attack strength of the assaulting infantry unit.  Other types of weapons may be used but would only harm as many friendly infantry in the assault and harm the building directly (which might need to be captured for victory or scenario purposes).  If an armor unit decides to lend its non-AP firepower to the assault, any damage is done directly to the building structure limit itself (as dictated by rule 5.041 below).  One half of this attack strength, rounded up, is directed as an attack against the friendly infantry initiating the overrun attack (as collateral splash damage, since the overrunning infantry are outside trying to get in, and don"t have the advantage of the protection of the building).  The infantry inside of a building are unharmed by any firepower that is "lent" other than by AP batteries.

5.015 Friendly Fire During Assaults-  If a building is being overrun by enemy forces, friendly forces may fire "on the building" to assist in trying to prevent the enemy infantry from successfully assaulting the building, but at a high cost.  In conjunction with rule 5.014 above, any friendly fire directed to protect a building from being assaulted does half damage to the building and attacks at full strength against the infantry units assaulting the building.  Using this tactic, it may be possible to lend aid to the besieged units but the building itself is going to get damaged in the process.   Friendly units within the building do not suffer any damage from friendly fire until the building reaches zero structure points.

5.016 Exceeding Structure Point Damage- When a building reaches zero structure points, it collapses doing an immediate 1:1 attack against any infantry still inside.  If a single attack takes a building from positive structure points to negative structure points, then any attack strength points that exceed the building structural capacity are divided by two (rounding up) and then translated directly into attack strength points against the infantry occupying the building.  For example; a single squad of infantry is occupying a building that has three structure points left.  A heavy tank fires on the building, doing 4 points of damage, doubled due to the nature of its weapons to 8 strength points.  This translates to 8 structure points, taking the building to 3 to negative 5.  The infantry inside the building undergo a 3 (5 divided by two, rounded up) point strength attack.

5.041 Regular Attacks- Any unit with an attack strength may attack a building.  AP weapons have full effect on buildings.  All weapons fired at buildings automatically hit the building if fired at a building within range.  Any weapon fired at a building does damage equal to their attack strength.  Thus an OGRE main battery, with an attack strength of 4, would do 4 structure points of damage to a building.  If the OGRE fired four AP batteries at the building, it would only do 4 structure points of damage to the building.

 

6.00 LASERS

6.021 Pulse Lasers.  Any laser may fire at a lower power setting and a higher frequency.  As such, a laser may fire two 1 point attack strength pulses per turn instead of the normal single two point attack strength beam.  Range is unaffected.  Firing in rapid pulse mode allows a laser to fire on a particular cruise missile up to twice per turn.  The laser may not spread its attack strength between two different Cruise Missiles.  Rule 6.04 still applies even when firing in pulse mode.

6.09 Overruns.  A laser being overrun fires at normal strength.   A damaged laser does not fire at all.

 

BATTLEFIELDS(tm)



SUPPLEMENT CHANGES

3.00 MILITIA

3.01    Militia Units.  A "militia" unit represents a platoon of twenty to thirty individuals equipped with limited resources and training.  They do not have battlesuits, instead, the best equipped militia units have combat environment suits (CES).  CES are sealed against NBC and offer some (limited) protection from shrapnel.  Limited vision aids (mostly low light and telescopic) are included at the officer level and basic communication exists between all members of the platoon with the commander having communication links to the command levels of other platoons or whatever is acting as the headquarters for this unit.  Weapons are limited to small arms, (sometimes outdated examples of such), basic explosives and very limited anti-vehicle capacity.  Militia are, traditionally, untrained or have very little training.  A trained or experienced militia might represent a group of local reservists, active guerillas, freedom fighters or even deserters from one of the powers that be who have banded together.  Militia might be the area's only heroes or the scourge of the local country side.

3.032 Militia Riding Vehicles.  Militia may ride certain vehicles as described below.  They mount and dismount like other infantry.  They may not attack or defend while mounted, even if they are riding open topped or flat bed equipped vehicles.  If they are attacked separately from their carrying vehicle, they are automatically destroyed.  The carrying vehicle may experience spillover fire from the attack normally.

3.033 Vehicle Capacity for Militia.  A truck, armed truck, hovertruck, armed hovertruck or GEV-PC may carry one squad of militia at a time.  This is due to the fact that these people are not trained for rapid deployment or efficient use of vehicle space for storing equipment.  Most are simply throwing their gear in the back then hanging on for dear life while the vehicle speeds off to their destination.

3.04 Militia Attack.  Militia attacks are not doubled in overrun situations.  Their lighter weapons and cut-rate electronics prevent them from being as effective in close combat as other, better equipped units are.

3.05 Militia Defense.  Militia are unarmored and poorly trained.   They take double casualties from any AP type weapon.  When any non-AP type weapon attacks a militia unit, a "D" result destroys one squad of militia while an "X" result destroys two squads of militia.  Militia are attacked at the 2:1 odds column when they are engaged by AP weapons found on OGREs, Super Heavy Tanks or other units.

3.051 Militia Defense vs. Shockwave.  Militia are unarmored and extremely fragile.  Ground burst and airburst weapons were designed to destroy units like militia with ease.  They use the "D0 Armor Unit or any GEV" line of the Effects of Missile Explosion Table (Shockwave 4.04).  They get the same defensive bonuses as infantry: +1 in forest or swamp, +2 in town or rubble.

3.06 Militia in Overruns.  Militia units attack strength is not doubled in overruns.  Any overrun situation where regular MI infantry and militia are involved on one side, any infantry casualties required to be taken in an overrun situation MUST BE taken FIRST from militia units that are present.  Militia were always the first to suffer casualties with regard to unit losses.  For example, two MI units and a Militia unit enter into an overrun situation.  The result calls for the elimination of two infantry strength points from the attacker, the first of which must come from the Militia unit that is present.

 

BACK